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Learn from Industry Leaders How to Kick-Start Your Nursing Career

January 2014

Student nurses and new nurses – we invite you to share your fundamental questions with us on the Nursing Notes by Johnson & Johnson Facebook Page and on Twitter @JNJNursingNotes! Each month, we will pick a few questions to highlight in this section with responses provided by seasoned nurses.

Student nurses and new nurses – we invite you to share your fundamental questions with us on the Nursing Notes by Johnson & Johnson Facebook Page and on Twitter @JNJNursingNotes! Each month, we will pick a few questions to highlight in this section with responses provided by seasoned nurses. - See more at: http://jjnursingnotes.com/JAN14/#sthash.84NnZPfI.dpufsdfsdf
Student nurses and new nurses – we invite you to share your fundamental questions with us on the Nursing Notes by Johnson & Johnson Facebook Page and on Twitter @JNJNursingNotes! Each month, we will pick a few questions to highlight in this section with responses provided by seasoned nurses. - See more at: http://jjnursingnotes.com/JAN14/#sthash.84NnZPfI.dpuf

Q. What advice would you give to young nurses first starting out in their careers?

A. I would tell them that there is no limit to what they can do. I know it is hard when you are just starting out – you are challenged and feeling overwhelmed – but you can truly take your career any direction you choose. The sky is the limit. You can do whatever you want!

-Jan Revella, RN, arthritis nurse specialist and director of research and education at the Sonoran Spine Center in Phoenix, Ariz. Revella has been a nurse for 39 years.


Q. What would you say to a nurse who is interested in rheumatology?

A. Rheumatology nursing is incredibly rewarding because we make such a difference in our patients’ lives. There is currently a great demand for nurses in this field, as there is a shortage of both rheumatologists and rheumatology nurses. Try it, especially if you are willing to learn. And don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t understand the immune system right away!

Q. What is one thing you wish you had known when you started your career?

A. I wish I had known how versatile nursing can be. I think that when I started out in nursing, I thought mainly of working in a hospital or an operating room. However, the truth is that there is a huge range of nursing disciplines, and nurses have the opportunity to really carve out a niche for themselves.

-Victoria Ruffing, RN, CCRN, nurse manager at the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md. Ruffing has been nursing for 25 years.


Q. What are the benefits of advanced nursing degrees? Do you recommend nurses pursue education beyond their BSN?

A. I absolutely recommend continuing education for all nurses. I started out as a hospital nurse with a three-year diploma, but I always had passion for learning more. I went on to get my bachelor’s degree, then my master’s degree, and became a clinical nurse specialist. Today, I am pursuing my Ph.D. at 57-years-old.

Nurses should never stop learning. There are always opportunities for nurses with advanced education that open up a whole new world for effective patient care. For me, those opportunities have been integral to my career, and my focus now is on educating the next generation of nurses to continue moving forward.

-Sheree C. Carter, RN, MSN, CNS, president of the Rheumatology Nurses Society and clinical assistant professor at the University of Alabama in Huntsville College of Nursing. Carter has been a practicing nurse for more than 30 years.

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