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Emergency Nurse

ASN or BSN

Emergency Nurses treat patients in emergency situations where they’re experiencing trauma or injury. These nurses quickly recognize life-threatening problems and are trained to help solve them on the spot. They can work in hospital emergency rooms, ambulances, helicopters, urgent care centers, sports arenas, and more. As an Emergency Nurse, you’ll treat a variety of conditions from sore throats to heart attacks for patients of all ages and backgrounds.

Things You'll Do:

  • Stabilize patients experiencing trauma
  • Minimize pain
  • Quickly uncover medical conditions
  • Teach patients about injury prevention

Your job characteristics:

  • Fast-paced
  • Multifaceted
  • Structured
  • Patient-facing

How You'll Get There
  • Get Your
    Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) or Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)
  • Pass Your
    National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN)
  • You can start working as a Registered Nurse.
    More about becoming an RN ›
  • You’ll need a minimum of two years of emergency nursing experience before you apply to take your certification exam.
  • Get Your
    Emergency nursing certification from the Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing (BCEN), a division of the Emergency Nurses’ Association.
  • You can get certified in emergency (CEN), flight (CFRN), pediatric emergency (CPEN), and critical care ground transport (CTRN) nursing.
  • Become a
    Certified Emergency Nurse
  • The BCEN requires re-certification every four years. You can renew your certification by either taking a computerized exam or logging continuing education hours.

More About this Specialty
  • Where You
    Can Work

    • Emergency rooms in hospitals
    • Urgent care centers
    • Helicopters

    find jobs
  • How Much You
    Can Make

      an average salary of

      $44K - $57K

    find salary by state
  • What Else You
    Can Expect

    • This specialty is extremely fast-paced, which can be either daunting or energizing, depending on your personality.
    • With an emergency nursing background, you’ll also have the option to work as an administrator, manager, researcher, or educator.

  • Meet
    Laurie

    A new ER nurse
    at the age
    of 45

    See her story
  • Meet
    Pat

    Emergency Nurse, BS/BSN

    When two of my best friends went off to college and told me about nursing school, I couldn't wait to do the same thing.

    read her story
  • Meet
    Tim

    Trauma Nurse, Associate

    It's hard for me to believe that I have been a nurse for almost 24 years. After being laid off from PanAm...

    read his story

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