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Moving Up

Today’s nursing shortage has created a need for more nurses, and more with advanced degrees, right now. Whether you’re a practicing nurse looking to advance your career, or you’re coming back after time away from the profession, there are steps you can take to get to a new level.
  • If you’re ready to grow in your nursing career, here are some things you can do:

  • Get an advanced degree

    If you're working as a Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurse, completing further education and earning your Registered Nurse license can open the doors to over 100 specialty areas. If you're a Registered Nurse or you've got your Bachelor of Science in Nursing and want to take on a leadership role or an educational role, getting your Master's will provide you an entry level degree in the field. If you're interested in conducting research, you can go for your PhD. By 2015, those nurses interested in becoming an NP, a CNS, a Nurse Anesthetist, or a Nurse Midwife will have to complete their education at the doctoral level and obtain a DNP.

    Here are some schools that offer advanced degrees:

    • Starting
      Out

      Whether you’re just out of high school, or looking for a new career, here are some ways to get started in nursing.

      See the steps
    • Find Your
      School

      All Nursing Programs

      see more
    • Explore Specialties

        • Certified Nurse Midwife
        • A holistic approach to pregnancy. You’ll work with women with low-risk pregnancies, and help them after the baby arrives.
        • Ambulatory Care Nurse
        • Get outside the hospital. Work in clinics, schools, pain management centers and more, focusing on pain management and treatment of chronic disease.
        • Camp Nurse
        • Nursing and nature. You’ll care for people attending camps and retreats. Treat mosquito bites and broken bones to flu breakouts, or care for the chronically ill.
        • Cardiac Care Nurse
        • Nurses of the heart. You’ll treat patients with heart conditions, and can work in a range of specialties, from pediatrics to geriatrics, or surgical to ambulatory.
        • Cardiac Cath Lab Nurse
        • Heart care plus technology. You’ll help patients with heart disease by assisting with catheterization procedures like angioplasties, valvuloplasties and stent placements.
        • Case Management Nurse
        • Keep your patients healthy and out of the hospital. You’ll coordinate long-term care for patients of all ages with conditions like HIV/AIDS, or cancer.
        • Clinical Nurse Leader
        • Oversee the medical team. You’ll work with doctors, pharmacists, social workers, and more, to incorporate new technologies and give patients the best care possible.
        • Clinical Nurse Specialist
        • Part nurse, part manager. You’ll treat patients in your area of specialty and give guidance to fellow nurses.
        • Nurse Anesthetist
        • Give anesthesia and anesthesia-related care to patients. You’ll be one of the more in-demand and well-paid nurses.
        • Nurse Practitioner
        • The primary healthcare provider under a doctor. You can choose from several different specialty areas, work in a hospital or run your own practice.
      find out more
  • Sign up for Continuing Education

    Many hospitals offer Continuing Education (CE) courses through local nursing schools and universities. Check out what your hospital, or medical facility, has to offer, and also sign up for the free Continuing Education program from Johnson & Johnson’s Campaign for Nursing’s Future and Nursing Spectrum/NurseWeek.

    Every year in May, in celebration of Nurse’s Week, a new free program is offered. It’s available to take throughout the year, until the next program starts the following May.

    TAKE THIS YEAR’S FREE COURSE

  • If you’ve taken a break and want to get back into nursing,
    here are some ways to do it:

  • Take refresher courses

    These classes will teach you about the current state of the profession, the latest techniques and technologies, and refresh the skills you learned in nursing school. They’ll prepare you for the job you want, in nursing. There are 322 schools that offer refresher courses. Here are a few:

    • Starting
      Out

      Whether you’re just out of high school, or looking for a new career, here are some ways to get started in nursing.

      See the steps
    • Find Your
      School

      All Nursing Programs

      see more
    • Explore Specialties

        • Certified Nurse Midwife
        • A holistic approach to pregnancy. You’ll work with women with low-risk pregnancies, and help them after the baby arrives.
        • Ambulatory Care Nurse
        • Get outside the hospital. Work in clinics, schools, pain management centers and more, focusing on pain management and treatment of chronic disease.
        • Camp Nurse
        • Nursing and nature. You’ll care for people attending camps and retreats. Treat mosquito bites and broken bones to flu breakouts, or care for the chronically ill.
        • Cardiac Care Nurse
        • Nurses of the heart. You’ll treat patients with heart conditions, and can work in a range of specialties, from pediatrics to geriatrics, or surgical to ambulatory.
        • Cardiac Cath Lab Nurse
        • Heart care plus technology. You’ll help patients with heart disease by assisting with catheterization procedures like angioplasties, valvuloplasties and stent placements.
        • Case Management Nurse
        • Keep your patients healthy and out of the hospital. You’ll coordinate long-term care for patients of all ages with conditions like HIV/AIDS, or cancer.
        • Clinical Nurse Leader
        • Oversee the medical team. You’ll work with doctors, pharmacists, social workers, and more, to incorporate new technologies and give patients the best care possible.
        • Clinical Nurse Specialist
        • Part nurse, part manager. You’ll treat patients in your area of specialty and give guidance to fellow nurses.
        • Nurse Anesthetist
        • Give anesthesia and anesthesia-related care to patients. You’ll be one of the more in-demand and well-paid nurses.
        • Nurse Practitioner
        • The primary healthcare provider under a doctor. You can choose from several different specialty areas, work in a hospital or run your own practice.
      find out more
  • Contact local hospitals

    You can also contact local hospitals, nursing schools and nurse recruiters for more information on refresher courses, and other ways to help you get back in to nursing.

    FIND HOSPITALS NEAR YOU AT HOSPITALCONNECT.COM

    If you haven’t been able to work because of an illness or disability, you might be eligible for a grant from Nurse’s House, a national fund for nurses in need.

    FIND FUNDING AT NURSESHOUSE.ORG

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